Sir Thomas COMPTON[1]

Male Abt 1564 - 1626  (~ 62 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Thomas COMPTON 
    Prefix Sir 
    Born Abt 1564  Compton, Warwichshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died Apr 1626  Cranbroke, Kent Co., England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I29841  Carney Genealogy
    Last Modified 30 Aug 2014 

    Family Elizabeth BIGGE,   b. Abt 1590, Cranbroke, Kent Co., England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Aug 1638, Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 48 years) 
    Children 
     1. John COMPTON,   b. Abt 1604, Cranneboro, Kent, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1656, Roxbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 52 years)
    Last Modified 29 Aug 2016 
    Family ID F5037  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • According to the Compton/Wyngates John Compton the 1st would be the son of Thomas Compton and his father was Henry Compton and His Father was Peter Compton. This is where it get confusing Henry Compton Had nephew named Henry he was The Bishop of London He adopted John the 1st when his father Thomas Died and brought him back to England and then sent him back to America. -------------------- Comptons are an ancient family, traceable to the Anglo-Saxon Alwyne, circa (ca.) 1042, a contemporary to King Edward the Confessor, in the times before surnames. "Compton" means a settlement (town) in or on a hill. Alwyne's son Turchill (or Turchid), Saxon Earl of Warwick at the time of the Norman conquest (1066), did not assist the English King Harold (contrary to his father, who "fought valiantly" against the invading forces according to Comptonology), thereby earning the gratitude of William the Conqueror. (See also Wynyates for a narrative of this early history. Lord Compton cites Collins, whom I have been unable to locate.) He was therefore allowed to retain his lordship and many landholdings, and an inspection of the Domesday Book is replete with Compton estates. Turchill became one of the early English to have a surname "de Eardene" (presumably from his residence at Arden). His son Osbert had several sons, including Philip (ca. 1200), who were the first in the line to take the surname de Compton. Philip was followed in the line by Thomas, Philip, Robert, Robert, Thomas, Edmund, William, Robert, Edmund, William (where the Wm. Bingham Compton document ends, ca. 1482), son Compton (possibly Peter, b. ca. 1500), Henry, William, Spencer, to our first American William, b. 1622 in Gravesend, New York. The researcher can compare the Bingham Compton document to Wyngates and observe the close (but not completely consistent) parallels in the genealogies. There is an ancestral (portions dating back to the 12th century) castle in Warwick, England, called Compton Wynyates [sometimes referred to as Wyngates], or "Compton in the Hole" (for its topography), which has been modified over the years and circumstances. The castle is the principal subject of Compton Wynyates. COMPTONS For a discussion of this and other coats of arms, see Compton Wynyates, p,. 28 citation infra. This one is the most distinguished of the Comptons, traceable to Sir William Compton. The royal lion here was conferred by Henry VIII.
      Compiled by: Stephen Compton 1999

  • Sources 
    1. [SAuth] Jim Carney, compiled by James H Carney [(E-ADDRESS), & MAILING ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE], Minyama, Queensland 4575 AUSTRALIA.